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When done by someone with skill, photography can reveal an immense amount about its subject with just a glance. While most of us struggle to keep our photos in focus, some people are capable of turning a simple camera into a doorway, leading you to view the world in a new way. Weilun Chong is, without a doubt, one of those photographers. Of course, if showing the world in a new light is your goal, it doesn’t hurt to snap your photos at the moment people are alighting from the train!

Born in Malaysia and educated in Singapore, Weilun has been taking photographs for 20 years, though he’s only gotten really serious about it in the last 3. It seems that Weilun is particularly interested in documentary photography, and it really shows in these pictures.

Taken in a Singaporean subway station, Weilun snapped these shots while straddling the gap between the subway platform and the train.  Both candid and secretive, they somehow manage to make you feel simultaneously close to people you’ve never seen before and even further than you thought possible.

It’s a beautiful project, but I have to admit I’m glad that I wasn’t the subject. He might have caught me picking my nose…

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Website: Please Mind The Gap

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Using the trains every day, it’s easy to become numb to the hot mass of humanity thronging about you. The other patrons become something to step around or to be drowned out with headphones. While we certainly don’t expect you to start chatting up your fellow riders–really, please, don’t do that, you’ll just annoy them–it wouldn’t hurt to take a moment to see them not as a crowd to be navigated, but as individuals going on a short journey with you…except that guy who smacked you in the face while unfolding his newspaper. He’s a jerk.

If you want to see more gorgeous photography, be sure to check out Weilun Chong’s personal website.

Source: Kotaro