akimasa1

At serious sushi chains in Japan, you can usually order sushi pieces one by one off of a menu at your seat, or put your fate in the hands of the chef by asking for the omakase course. Sushi purists know that omakase basically translates as “leave it to you” and that’s exactly what you’re doing when you order omakase; you’re giving the chef free license to make whatever creations he’d like.

It appears there’s one sushi shop in Hong Kong, though, where omakase might not be such a good idea: Akimasa Sushi features a variety of sushi options so bizarre, strange and downright disturbing that ordering omakase is like looking into the eyes of the cosmic entity Cthulhu him/her/itself.

Let’s see what’s in store:

▼ Starting with the most normal thing on the menu, here we have what appears to be shrimp fetus.

akimasa8

▼  Fried smelt. Possibly. We don’t know.akimasa11

▼ This is fried scallop just sort of haphazardly shoved into a gunkan-maki.

akimasa10

▼ They tell us this is crab analogue. We say it’s serpent tongue.akimasa9

▼ Here we have sweet azuki beans – typically used in desserts in Japan – slathered in mayonnaise and dark magic incantations. akimasa1

▼ Fruit-flavored gelatin topped with wasabi and tears of despair. akimasa3

▼ Tuna salad. Possibly after ingestion.

akimasa2

▼ Boiled octopus, apparently of the genetically mutated variety.

akimasa5

▼ Pineapple sushi. This one doesn’t look all bad – although last time we check raw fruit doesn’t really count as sushi just because it’s uncooked.

akimasa6

▼ Ice cream sushi! Because, at this point, f&$# it!

akimasa4

▼ Pretty standard-looking shrimp gunkan.

akimasa12

▼ Duck sushi, which actually sounds delicious.

akimasa13

▼ Boiled egg sushi. Note on the left-hand side, the egg itself appears to be vomiting.

akimasa7

Now, it’s easy – like we just did – to criticize this place for its bonkers original sushi creations and its apparent half-assed approach to normal sushi menu items, but it’s worth noting Akimasa is apparently quite popular in Hong Kong. So popular, in fact, there are now eight of them spread across the city. Sure, apparently young people tend to go just so they can tell their friends they went to that gross sushi place, but that’s the same reason people visit Las Vegas’ Heart Attack Grill, and at least Akimasa doesn’t literally kill people.

Source: 宅宅新聞新浪博客 中国語), Facebook 明将寿司

[ Read in Japanese ]