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Despite the increasingly obvious and alarm-inducing deterioration of the political relationship between Japan and China, it appears there’s one Japanese export the Chinese just can’t possibly bring themselves to boycott: Manga and anime.

Even at a time when the Chinese are openly fist-fighting other Chinese in the streets for the crime of choosing a Japanese car, manga and anime – especially, it seems, of the old-school variety – have pervaded Chinese pop culture to the point that it’s not only accepted to read it regularly, some Chinese business owners are going to great lengths to cash in on the popularity of Japan’s biggest pop cultural export.

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Take, for example, the new Seinto Seiya (or Knights of the Zodiac for non-purists) restaurant recently opened in Beijing.

Apparently conceived of by a restaurateur who is an avid fan of the classic series that originally ran in the 80s manga heyday, the Seinto Seiya restaurant features wall art and menu items inspired by the manga and anime series, a bookshelf full of the original manga, series goods and products and, of course, beautiful cosplaying waitresses.

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According to Chinese media, the restaurant is especially frequented and loved by hardcore fans of Seinto Seiya. One might think the restaurant does a brisk business selling series-themed goods, but it turns out the goods and products on display all belong to the owner as part of his personal collection.

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Knowing that such a labor of love can actually get off the ground and start making at least a little money is all the inspiration we need to start drawing up our plans for the Futurama cafe we’ve always dreamed of owning.

Source: NariNari
Photos: Weibo