renewable energy

Perovskite promises power-producing paint for pennies per pint

Back in 2009, a research team from the University of Tokyo led by Professor Tsutomu Miyasaka found that a substance called perovskite had the potential to generate solar power. However, at the time it only had a very weak power conversion efficiency (PCE) of about four percent and would break down in just a few minutes.

Because of these sizable flaws, not could practical use could be made of perovskite and the discovery lay dormant for a few years. Then, after a Korean team managed to double the PCE in 2011, research into the material was reignited. Now as scientists around the world continue to work on it, the PCE has become well above 20 percent and comparable with the standard silicon-based solar panels that we see today.

With perovskite being drastically cheaper to produce, more flexible to use, and now as efficient as regular solar panels, could we be on the verge of a solar energy revolution?

Read More

Move your feet and charge your phone! Bright young inventor shows how it’s done! 【Video】

Reusable, renewable energy is the holy grail of the modern age and the world needs the best and the brightest to find effective sources of it. With that in mind, some of the world’s biggest organizations hold events for the up-and-coming to showcase their ideas for a better tomorrow, and at the Google Science Fair this year one young “Tony Stark” from the Philippines has unleashed a brilliant idea on the world that is getting everyone’s attention: footwear that generates electricity.

Read More

Energy Companies Make Move Toward Massive Geothermal Development in Fukushima

Idemitsu Kosan, INPEX and other energy corporations began speaking with locals on April 3 about building a geothermal power plant inside Bandai-Asahi National Park in Fukushima Prefecture. If locals agree with the plan, research would begin this year with operation commencing in about 10 years. The area is expected to produce 270,000 kilowatts of geothermal energy, higher than anywhere else in Japan.

Read More