Map

Non-existent phantom island in Japan finally removed from atlas after eight years of publication

Good thing no one tried to go there.

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Space agency in Japan has a surprising hidden girl in its visitor maps

Once you see her you’ll never unsee her… which sucks if you need to find your way around the Tsukuba Space Center.

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Oops they did it again! Japan removed from map for the second time by Olympic charity

After originally omitting Japan from the world map, a PyeongChang Olympic website fixes the mistake only to have it erased again weeks later.

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Iwami in Tottori Prefecture is now offering a Free!/High Speed! anime tie-in location map guide

Fans of Free! and its High Speed! feature film adaptation can now visit all the places their favorite swimming boys would have frequented.

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Interactive online map of Kyoto lets you toggle between modern day and the 9th century

If you’re a history buff, or time traveler, this could come in handy.

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Hidden world discovered under Japanese rice paddy!

Every year, farmers in the village of Inakadate, Aomori Prefecture, plant beautiful natural murals in the fields using different varieties of rice. The practice began in 1994, and now hundreds of thousands of people visit the tiny village each summer to see their rice paddy art.

But it’s not just planted rice they’ve been drawing pictures with. Underneath one of those rice fields, another hidden gem has been lurking – a world map! And it’s there for all to see…on Google Maps.

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East meets West in the Pacific-centered version of the world map

Depending on what part of the world you live in, one of these maps will look right at home while the other might seem kind of off. However, given the overall dominance of the Euro-centric map, the other one is more likely to give an uncomfortable feeling to a greater number of people.

While both are currently in use in different countries, is it possible that one map is more valid than another?

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Make a map of Japan in your oven with these intricate cookie cutters

Think you can identify all the prefectures of Japan? Yeah, neither can we. But that’s okay because now with the help of this impressively accurate cookie cutter set, you can study and eat a map of Japan at the same time. Mmmm, knowledge.

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The incredible isolation of North Korea — In one map

North Korea is often referred to as “The Hermit Kingdom” in the west — and one map demonstrates why.

The website MarineTraffic displays live data of cargo ships over 299 gross tonnage, and while South Korean ports of Incheon, Busan, and Ulsan are bustling with activity, shipboard cargo movement in the North barely registers, despite the country having eight major seaports.

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A perfect blend of fashion and function: the Tokyo Subway Map Necktie!

Even for those living in Tokyo, its plate-of-spaghetti-like tangle of train lines can be overwhelming to navigate. Worse for visitors, it’s hard not to get lost, but you also don’t want to walk around gawking at a map like some touristy chump. So, for basically anyone in Tokyo, we humbly present the Subway Map Necktie.

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New high-res imaging of the moon released, the dark side is better off that way

In 2007 the Selenological and Engineering Explorer (SELENE) was launched by what is now known as the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA). Its mission was to orbit the Earth’s moon and gather information about its terrain.

The explorer was nicknamed, Kaguya, after a character from the Japanese folktale, The Tale of the Bamboo Cutter which was recently remade as a Studio Ghibli feature film, Kaguya Hime no Monogatari. In a nicely timed announcement with hype from the movie, the Geospatial Information Authority of Japan (GSI) has released a high-res 3D map of our moon that can be viewed from the comfort of your own browser.

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Minor earthquake brings laughter, bikini girl to Japan

At 12:30 p.m. on Sunday, August 4, Northeastern Japan started to shake. On the Japanese shindo scale, the quake measured between 3 and 4 (overhead lights sway and objects rattle, but some people who are on the move may not notice it) in most areas, a ‘low-5’ at its strongest. Thankfully, there are thought to have been no casualties as the tremor was relatively short-lived, and with the quake of March 2011 and weeks of resulting aftershocks having been far stronger, the people of Tohoku are now fairly hardened when it comes to smaller rumbles.

Curiously though, no sooner had the earthquake passed than a few jokesters began sharing the above image from the Japan Meteorological Agency, along with messages of “LOL” and ‘Why do I suddenly feel like I want to go to Northeastern Japan?”

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