Jiro Dreams of Sushi

The world’s most famous sushi restaurant sells seaweed too, so we made nori rice balls with it

Mr. Sato whips up a batch of onigiri with a little help from Sukibayashi Jiro.

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How to get an amazing Sukiyabashi Jiro sushi lunch for less than 15 bucks

Often forgotten branch has amazing deals and an extremely unusual photograph policy.

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Should it really take so long to become a sushi chef? Japanese entrepreneur calls system a scam

Since even before the phenomenally popular documentary Jiro Dreams of Sushi put the idea up on the big screen, there’s been a belief in Japan that it takes a long, long time to become a skilled sushi chef. As a matter of fact, properly preparing slices of raw fish atop morsels of vinegared rice has traditionally been considered such a complex skill that when conveyor belt sushi restaurants and other low-price opportunities to enjoy the dish first appeared in Japan, they were scoffed at by gourmands as “not real sushi.”

But are attitudes changing? Kaitenzushi restaurants, as revolving sushi joints are called in Japanese, are more popular than ever. What’s more, some people are no longer convinced that it’s as difficult to make sushi as the old masters say, including one of Japan’s most famous entrepreneurs, who’s been calling the whole idea that preparing good sushi requires several years of training a scam.

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17 mouthwatering photos from the legendary sushi restaurant where Obama just ate dinner

President Obama and Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe just finished a meal at Tokyo’s Sukiyabashi Jiro, one of the best sushi restaurants in the world.

Sukiyabashi Jiro is headed up by 89-year-old master chef Jiro Ono. In addition to his restaurant’s three-star Michelin rating, Jiro is widely regarded as the world’s top sushi chef and was featured in the 2011 documentary “Jiro Dreams of Sushi.”

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