Johnny’s

Talent agency frustrated at idol fans’ aggressiveness, tells them to stop on official website

Instinctively chasing down idols may be acceptable in fans’ eyes, but not so in everyone else’s.

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SMAP idol group members issue farewell messages to fans

The popular idol group SMAP broke up on December 31 after performing music together for more than a quarter century.

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The five members of the popular group appeared sombre during their special television appearance last night. 

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Sayonara, SMAP! Japan’s biggest boy band reportedly breaking up

Reports indicate that the five-man vocal group’s 25-year stint in the Japanese spotlight is about to come to a close.

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Is the year-end Arashi Concert about to go high-tech with facial recognition for attendees?

Rumors are flying around the Japanese internet that facial recognition technology may be introduced at least partially at the Arashi concerts being held later this month.

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Unhinged Japanese boyband fan stalks “rival” on Twitter, demands they delete their account

They say that hell is a teenage girl. It sucks having to deal with burgeoning romantic feelings when most of the boys in your grade are more interested in giving each other wedgies and chasing balls around. That’s where boy bands come in! Obsessing over squeaky-clean, baby-faced guys with angelic voices gives young girls an outlet for their romantic ideals, as each boy band provides a pleasing variety of “safe” alternatives on which to have a crush (real boys, after all, are too unpredictable!) So it’s no wonder that sometimes girls can take things a little bit too far. When one Twitter user set her user icon to a pic of her favorite Japanese boyband member, little did she know that her actions would spark a stream of increasingly unhinged messages from a fellow fan.

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Who’s still buying physical media in Japan? Top 20 singles lists for the year reveal the answer

With a large music market and some of the world’s highest prices for physical releases, Japan has been very slow in adapting to digital distribution. Rights holders are finally warming up to the idea, though, and it doesn’t look like it’s ruining the industry in Japan. What downloadable music does seem to be doing, though, is splitting the country’s pop music market into two distinct parts, as the lists of Japan’s top 20 single downloads and CD purchases for the year are almost completely different.

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