Oreos

Krispy Kreme set to release new “Sweet America” range of doughnuts in Japan

The limited-edition collection features doughnuts dressed up with M&M’s, Oreo biscuits and Hershey’s chocolates.

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Comparing the new made-in-China Oreos to the made-in-Japan ones we knew and loved【Taste test】

RocketNews24’s Meg pits the two cookies against each other, and also tosses made-in-China-for-China Oreos into the fray.

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Mouth-watering cheesecake Oreos about to hit stores in Japan

No, not Oreo cheesecakes, but cheesecake Oreos!

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We try the new full-sized matcha Oreo cookies from Japan

The full-sized Oreo sandwich cookie now comes filled with a delicious green tea matcha cream centre.

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Celebrate the incoming Attack on Titan movie with a suitably colossal Oreo cookie 【Recipe】

With less than a month to go before the release of the live-action Attack on Titan film in Japan, related merchandise and tie-in collaborations have brought us everything from point cards to hot dogs in recent days.

Whether you’re anxiously awaiting the movie’s opening date here in Japan or further abroad, there’s one way everyone can join in the celebrations: with a giant Oreo cookie. Check out the delicious recipe after the jump, complete with all the mouth-watering step-by-step details. A snack this sweet and giant-sized is sure to stop any Colossal Titan in its tracks!

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Bacon-fried Oreos make a greasily delicious appearance in Japanese kitchens

Where Japan has taken Kit Kats (originally an English treat) to a whole ‘nother level with seasonal flavors, regional flavors, even “adult sweetness” varieties, America has taken a similar road with another chocolate goody: Oreo cookies.

Intrigued by America’s fascination with Oreos, one Japanese cook took her chances at making a fantastically American concoction: Bacon Fried Oreos. But how does the Japanese palate react? Find out after the jump.

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Our batch of homemade Oreos – Why didn’t we think of this before?

 

Pretty much everyone loves Oreos, and therein lies the problem. Even if you just picked up a pack on your last visit to the grocery store, odds are you, or someone else, has already gone through whatever stock you had in the house.

Case in point: right now we’re completely out of Oreos, and we’re not about to go out to buy more in the downpour that’s drenching Tokyo right now. While some people with less vision (or healthier eating habits) might patiently endure the hardship of no cookies, we decided instead to make our own Oreos from scratch with an incredibly simple recipe.

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Japan-exclusive Oreo Sticks – Can they compete with the real thing?

There are few things with the power to excite and abhor travellers more than foreign versions of sweets and cookies that exist back home. Even though we pass them by dozens of times a day in supermarkets and convenience stores in our own country, spot M&M’s, Doritos or even a Kit-Kat in a land where everything else is alien, and immediately we feel like home is not so far away; it’s like running into a friend from your home town during your first week of college where everything else is scary and unknown. What happens, though, if that same friend has a weird new haircut and is affecting some peculiar accent just because they’re in an unfamiliar town?

Oreo Sticks, a snack exclusive to Japan, will likely have the very same unnerving effect on snackophiles. With packaging familiar to millions, yet containing a snack entirely different to those we’re used to, Oreo Sticks have the potential to shatter cookie fans’ dreams, but with a little courage they could also be something quite wonderful.

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Hey Wait, These Aren’t Oreos! Chinese Netizens Angered by Good Deed Rewarded with Rip-Off Snack

If you’ve ever donated blood in Japan, you probably know that blood donors are often given tasty drinks and snacks as a kind of Thank-you gift for their good deed. Well, the same is apparently true in China. However, a snack received by one particular blood donor in China has caused considerable anger among Chinese internet users on Weibo, the Chinese version of twitter. Read More