discrimination

Man sues Tokyo wine tasting event for not allowing him to drink while operating a wheelchair

Valid safety concern or unjust discrimination?

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New list of inappropriate Japanese job interview questions from prefectural labor department

Governmental organization says your potential boss shouldn’t ask if you want to get married, where you were born, or what kind of car you drive.

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Tokyo Legoland Discovery Center apologizes for blocking deaf patrons from theme park

Tokyo Legoland Discovery Center bricked themselves into an uncomfortable corner when it comes to disability rights, and has issued a formal apology.

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Osaka stops putting rainbow marks on public toilets after complaints from LGBT communities

And hopefully learns a lesson in understanding in the process.

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Discrimination fears lead Japanese genetics society to replace words for dominant, recessive gene

But a potential problem is lurking in its proposed revision.

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The woman on the “I’m glad I’m Japanese” posters spotted in Kyoto? She’s actually Chinese

Turns out the controversial posters aren’t quite as nationalistic as their creators likely intended them to be.

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“I’m glad I’m Japanese” posters in Kyoto spark outrage among Japanese Twitter users

Mysterious posters draw concerned comments about the insensitive mentality of their anonymous creators.

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German linguist living in Japan says kanji characters used for Germany are discriminatory

Though the kanji can translate as “lonely country,” his complaint lies elsewhere.

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Japan’s largest housing website to offer LGBT support in finding tolerant landlords

It may not be the first, but it is easily the largest service of its kind.

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Japanese Twitter seems to have no problems with Karlie Kloss’ “geisha” photo shoot

With the controversy over the model’s Vogue photos ongoing, has anyone bothered to check on how Japan feels?

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Japanese government gives examples of what qualifies as “hate speech” in anti-discrimination law

Critics still likely to find problems with legislation.

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Japanese commercial explaining how to greet a foreigner accused of racism

A Kirin “Rich Green Tea” ad teaching Japanese people the appropriate way to greet foreigners attracted some criticism online, with some calling it racist.

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What do Japanese people think of Black- and Asian-Americans?【Video】

 Interviews on the street in Japan get some very interesting results.

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Is this new Star Wars promotional poster from China kinda racist? It certainly seems so

The promotional poster for the new entry in the Star Wars franchise appears to omit or downplay non-white actors.

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Survey by Japanese ministry reveals high rates of “maternity harassment” in workplace

A new survey conducted by the Japanese government found that nearly half of female temp workers faced discrimination as a result of being or becoming pregnant while in employment.

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YouTuber asks “Is it really racist if you can’t tell Asians from different countries apart?”

“All Asian people look alike” is something that many Westerners are bound to have heard at some point in their lives. While some people argue that such a statement is an example of racial discrimination, one man is out to challenge the view by arguing that not being able to tell people of certain ethnicities apart is not equivalent to being a racist.

British YouTuber GradeAUnderA recently posted a cheeky video titled Racism Test–See How Racist You Really Are!, which has already spread around the world during its short existence. In the video, he attempts to call out people who are hypersensitive to racism by daring his viewers to pass a five-round quiz in which they have to identify the ethnicity, vocation, and so on of certain people based solely on their outer appearances. Many Japanese net users have so far found the quiz to be extremely difficult–how will you fare?

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Japanese netizens support foreign comic after one Japanese man’s discriminatory remark

Jason Atsugiri is currently one of the hottest comedians on Japanese television. His “Why Japanese people?!” skit is so popular even kids who have zero English skills have mastered imitating his staged outbursts.

Because of that, when the comic tweeted about a possibly discriminatory remark he received at Tsukiji Fish Market during a shoot, Japanese netizens were surprised to see he didn’t lose his cool. Impressed, the post has been favorited and passed on by many, inspiring a much-welcomed discussion on how not to treat foreigners.

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5 discriminatory interview questions employers in Japan are no longer allowed to ask

For many young people in Japan, August means summer vacation, festivals and free time. For fourth-year university students however, it means time to start interviewing for jobs. The job-hunting process in Japan is long, grueling and very systematic, culminating in interview after interview for the jobless, soon-to-graduate, young adults.

Interviews can be nerve-wracking for even the most experienced candidates, but Japanese companies don’t always ask the most predictable questions. In fact, some of their questions can be downright weird. Many of these oddball interview questions, however, may not actually be legal.

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Another Japanese celebrity faces discrimination in France, this time netizens not so sympathetic

Back in April we saw legendary Japanese singer Gackt face discrimination while abroad in France. He managed to handle a frustrating situation with class, and his incident sparked a conversation online about racial discrimination.

Emiko Kaminuma, a well-known Japanese media personality, found herself in a similar spot while in France. She faced discrimination in a Paris restaurant, and she has been making a huge deal about it on her TV shows. However, her story seems to be a little different from Gackt’s….

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Washington Post writer catches heat for “dirty Korean beer” joke

There’s a reason I don’t write for the Washington Post. Actually, there are about a thousand reasons, almost all of which pertain to my own ineptness. Another one these reasons is that I occasionally write some embarrassing joke that gets completely misunderstood and blows up in my face.

So, I can relate on some level to the Washington Post’s writer and Tokyo bureau chief Anna Fifield. Her tweet, which jokingly translated a customer request sign as “Don’t bring your dirty Korean beer in here,” has led to some considerably harsh feedback from Japanese Twitter users.

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