Engrish

Japanese department store officially apologizes for English poster calling Kyoto the world’s enemy

Takashimaya still seems a little fuzzy on correct English, though.

Read More

Kanji T-shirt seen on U.S. TV show makes Japanese viewers giggle

According to his shirt, this guy isn’t just “huge in Japan”, he’s huge somewhere else too. 

Read More

English ad in Japan has some seeing a command to stay infected with coronavirus this Christmas

Department store chain wants to show concern for shoppers’ mental wellbeing, but some see a message of doom for their physical health.

Read More

English mistake makes Kyoto the enemy of the world

Look out — Japan’s old capital appears to be rising again, with an army of koi fish behind it.

Read More

Japanese PM’s “low-level English” tweet to Donald Trump reportedly slammed by his own party

A source at the Ministry of Foreign Affairs says they’ll be stepping in to help PM Suga in future.

Read More

Japanese Twitter users make Osaka Metro’s English translation mistakes into running joke, memes

This is why you should never use automated translation software in a professional setting.

Read More

Japanese mom finds kid’s cute rice bowl contains tale of dinosaur infidelity, illegitimate child

Eat up, kids! Also, be aware that sometimes mommies and daddies sleep around.

Read More

Why Does Engrish Happen in Japan? Moon ultra parking edition

Why Does Engrish Happen? is back with a look at what seems to be where Sailor Moon would park her car.

Read More

Piko Taro stops by Sesame Street to help Elmo and Cookie Monster with their version of PPAP【Vid】

The popular characters from the iconic TV series dress up in leopard print and sing in Engrish for Japan’s younger generation.

Read More

Foreigner accused of shoplifting tea in Japan, label to blame 【Why Does Engrish Happen in Japan?】

It’s often said that freedom isn’t free. In Japan, Free Tea isn’t either.

Read More

Why Does Engrish Happen in Japan? – Breakfast buffet edition

Is there a better way to start your day than with a nice plate of Italian wind salad and “near the broil with salt?”

Read More

Pizza Hut Japan asks customers “Don’t you hungry?” 【Why does Engrish happen in Japan?】

Sure, Pizza Hut, but do you English?

Read More

Five awkward moments that prove you’ve finally nailed that whole “living in Japan” thing

Here are five awkward, bittersweet moments that’ll make you realise you’ve finally become a seasoned expat…

Read More

Did Starbucks Japan forget to translate this important food allergen warning?

Nationwide, Japan Starbucks locations appear to be telling foreign customers to learn Japanese or risk anaphylactic shock.

Read More

Ham sandwich! Japanese netizens are loling at these nonsense car decals

If you live in Asia, you’re probably used to seeing Engrish phrases everywhere. When you’ve grown up reading and writing in kanji, hiragana, etc., the “foreign-ness” of English writing and phrases adds an air of mystery and style. But it’s exactly the same in the west too—people will buy all kinds of products with kanji characters written on them whether or not they know what they mean.

Here are some examples of decked-out cars with random, nonsensical Japanese phrases on them that have Japanese netizens laughing their socks off over.

Read More

Japanese tourist center asks small-penised travelers to not make a mess in the bathroom

While Japan’s highest mountain itself is the primary attraction, it’s not the only thing to see in the Mt. Fuji area. There’s also the Fuji Five Lakes, which would be beautiful enough to warrant a visit even if they didn’t have the famed peak serving as a dramatic backdrop.

But while travelers are happy to see the mountain and lakes alike, one thing none of them look forward to is a puddle of piss on the men’s room floor of a local visitor’s center. That’s why one facility has signs asking visitors to mind their aim when using the urinals, but while the Japanese text is a politely worded reminder, the English version seems to be implying that the reader’s penis really isn’t so impressive.

Read More

Mermaids and Fried Wikipedia: the art of translating menu items into English

Traveling in a country where you aren’t super confident with the lingo can be extremely daunting, and simple acts like ordering food become a bit of a nightmare. If you don’t speak the language, you won’t know what foods are on the menu or how they are prepared. Dictionaries, both paper and electronic, are definitely helpful tools when deciphering a menu and many restaurants also try to provide at least some English—one of the most used languages in the world—on their menus.

But sometimes, for all their good intentions, restaurants fail. While this may make ordering lunch a little bit trickier, it is at times like these that we are blessed with some wonderfully bad translated food names.

Today’s special dishes come compliments of restaurants in Taiwan and China that just couldn’t quite find the right words to describe their respective delicacies. Look forward to dishes including mermaids, fried Wikipedia and confused pizzas after the jump.

Read More

Strange Indian airport sign cautions visitors not to consume carpet

Every country has its own set of rules and customs that visitors may not initially be aware of. To meet the demands of the growing tourism industry, many governments have opted to implement multi-lingual signs and websites. Sometimes, however, the translations cause much more confusion than they prevent, like with this list of jobs foreigners aren’t allowed to do in Thailand.

Recently a similar goof occurred in India, this time due to some curiously mistranslated signage posted inside the Chennai International Airport, leaving visitors both amused and confused.

Read More

“Do honky” command Japanese TV show’s T-shirts

Once a year, Japan’s Fuji TV broadcasts a marathon program called FNS 27-Hour TV. A huge team of A-list comedians, musicians, and media personalities make appearances during the show, and since its beginning in 1997 it’s been a ratings hit for the network.

But as the younger generation increasingly looks to the Internet for entertainment content, this year Fuji TV wanted to remind viewers that TV is still relevant and worth watching. Oh, and also apparently that they should sleep with white people, if you take the program’s T-shirts at face value.

Read More

  1. 1
  2. 2