Heisei

Minds blown by wire art that shows transition to from old Japanese era to new【Video】

This creative depiction of Japan’s new era will play tricks on your mind and your eyes.

Read More

Japan announces new era name, Reiwa, but what does it mean and why was it chosen?

Prime Minister explains rationale behind decision and compares people of Japan to flowers, but not cherry blossoms.

Read More

Nightclub dancers, the Japan women’s national football team, and a famous Tokyo landmark are all hidden inside the design. 

Read More

The most popular Japanese baby names of the past 30 years, from Sakura to Shota

Meanings show hope for bold boys, beautiful girls in list of the most popular names of the Heisei era.

Read More

Commercial for obscure car part marker may become a milestone in Japanese animation

This 45 second spot is a wild ride, and might be the last cel anime of an era.

Read More

The one-year countdown officially begins for the end of the Heisei Era

Japan has just one year left with Emperor Akihito before his son ushers in a new era.

Read More

Japanese Emperor’s abdication date set, end of Heisei era now officially on the horizon

The Japanese Prime Minister made the announcement today, following a meeting held by the Imperial Household Council.

Read More

Japanese Emperor’s abdication date to be decided next month, expected later than initial reports

Emperor Akihito will likely be sitting on the Chrysanthemum Throne a little longer than most expected.

Read More

Japanese Emperor abdication date revealed by government officials in new report

The date will bring an end to Japan’s current Heisei era.

Read More

It’s the end of an era…literally! Emperor may abdicate throne in 2019 and end the Heisei Era

The question on everyone’s minds: what would the name of the next era be?

Read More

Itadakimasu! A brief history of the evolution of Japanese school lunches

In the 22nd year of the Meiji era (aka 1889), the very first Japanese kyūshoku (school lunch) was served up at an elementary school in Tsuruoka City, Yamagata Prefecture. Although the first menu was very simply prepared, it provided the growing children with an important source of nourishment that not all of them could receive at home.

Fast-forward to 2015–Japanese schoolchildren (and their teachers!) continue to eat school lunches every day, as opposed to children in many other countries who bring their lunches from home. If you’re working in a Japanese school, you should already be familiar with the daily feeling of either excitement or disappointment when you see the lunch menu for the day. But just consider this–would you rather eat the types of lunches served today, or those that were served 100 years ago? Read on to learn about the evolution of Japanese school lunches and decide for yourself!

Read More