lunch

Japanese sushi train restaurant offers unlimited food, drinks and desserts for less than $15!

There are more than 80 mouthwatering dishes to choose from, including ramen, fries, chicken, and, of course, plates and plates of sushi.

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Salvatore Cuomo restaurants are offering an all-you-can-eat pizza & pasta lunch buffet for cheap

Craving some carbs? Indulge in this limited-time weekday lunch special for only 800 yen (US$7) per person.

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McDonald’s Japan to introduce a super cheap Value Lunch menu

Satisfy your midday McDonald’s cravings without breaking the bank!

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Mr Sato takes a trip to Twitter Japan’s lunch room, gorges on their special menu

Our man Mr Sato was recently granted access to the offices of Twitter Japan—and it turns out they put on a great spread every Monday!

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It’s difficult to say if this Japanese power unicycle is cool or not

Starting this summer, Japanese company Onewheel will offer a limited number of these Onewheel i-1 motorized unicycles. Their revolutionary design and features are sure to make prospective buyers think long and hard about whether they’re actually really cool or incredibly lame. Even their catchphrase “What is this?” feeds the ambiguity.

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If you thought Japanese lunches couldn’t get any cuter, you were wrong

If you’re at all familiar with bento, you’ll probably know that a lot of people will go all out to create adorable (or just plain amazing) meals for their children— or inner otaku, for that matter. I’ve heard that there is fierce competition to make the cutest lunches (especially for special events like Sports Day) so it’s no wonder that techniques and trends are continually changing, and it seems that the latest fad in lunches is the humble dinner roll.

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Survey Reveals 24% of Workers in Japan Have Less Than $2.84 to Spend on Lunch

According to a 2012 survey of 2,000 Shinsei Bank employees, the average worker now spends 510 yen (US $5.79) on lunch every day. That’s down from 710 yen (US $8.06) in 2001 and 600 yen (US $6.81) in 2007. That’s a 30% decrease in twelve years.

Nikkan Spa, a popular magazine in Japan, conducted its own survey and found an even bleaker outcome. In a survey of 100 salarymen (office workers) and public servants in their 30s and 40s, a surprising 64 percent of workers admitted that they spend 500 yen (US $5.67) or less on lunch. An even more astonishing 24 percent of workers get by on just 250 yen (US $2.84) a day.

A measly 250 yen (US $2.84) won’t even buy a beef bowl at Sukiya, famed to be the cheapest lunch around. If these salarymen can’t even afford the cheapest meals available for purchase, what exactly are they eating? Let’s take a peek inside the slimmed-down lunchboxes of Japan’s typical worker.

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